Hold your boundaries or others will keep crossing them

Hold your boundaries or others will keep crossing them

Shiva was frustrated. She had just lost her early morning work time… again. Her colleague had seen her arrive and had taken the opportunity to ‘pop in for a quick chat’ before the day started. The first time it happened, Shiva politely indulged her colleague in the early morning chit-chat, thinking it was a once off, but after three days in a row, Shiva began to get upset.  

Sign post for certainty - closing the gap between intention and perception

Sign post for certainty - closing the gap between intention and perception

Guess what? It turns out we are not as transparent as we think we are. We know what we are thinking, we know what we mean, we know what we want … but just because we know what we’re on about, doesn't mean that others do.

Why the invisible work you're doing is holding you back

Why the invisible work you're doing is holding you back

To be known as someone who does valuable work, we need to be seen as someone who does valuable work. When Executives and CEOs look to their talent pipelines for the next generation of leaders, the people who grab their attention are people who are known to them, or known to others who then bring them to their attention. They stand out not just because of the good work they are doing, but because they are known to be doing good work – their efforts are visible.

3 tips for getting your staff to speak up in meetings

3 tips for getting your staff to speak up in meetings

Great leaders build engagement. Engagement in meetings requires contribution and involvement. Many leaders I work with complain of a lack of engagement from their team members during meetings, despite their best efforts. This is not always about their leadership or their teams’ engagement; often there are other factors at play.

When the problem is the solution – taking the counterintuitive path.

Getting the best out of others is not an easy task. Helping your team members to be more effective, more productive, and more engaged is not always as simple as asking them to be so, or equipping them with the skills or support to be so. In fact, sometimes it’s not even about the very problem that’s causing the problem. To be an effective leader of people requires us to be flexible in the way we approach and support our people. Sometimes it even calls on us to allow the problem to get worse before it gets better. 

Eluded by your quick wit? You’re not alone.

The ability to think quickly is a highly valued skill in the workplace. People who respond to questions off the cuff, who make coherent contributions when called upon (without warning) or who always seem to know the right thing to say in the right moment to say it, are admired by many of us. Especially those of us who need more time to gather our thoughts. 

“Don't worry about what others think of you” – why this is good AND bad advice

Not worrying about what other people think of you can be liberating. It can inspire you to be fearless, to be brave, and to push your own limits without having to kowtow to the beliefs, expectations and desires of others. When we learn to live according to our own values, we become better at what we do; more engaged in our endeavours, and more satisfied with our lives. And who doesn't want that??